Mary Mcleod Bethune

Biographies

Mary Mcleod Bethune by Lynne Green
Madame Blavatsky: The Mother of Modern Spirituality by Gary Lachman
Kurlumarniny: We Come from the Desert By Monty (Minyjun) Hale
The Autobiographical Self in Time and Culture By Qi Wang
The Letters of General Richard S. Ewell: Stonewall’S Successor By Donald C. Pfanz

Mary Mcleod Bethune by Lynne Green

English | July 25, 2006 | ISBN: 0618677364 | 34 Pages | PDF | 3 MB

Houghton Mifflin Social Studies: American Hero Biographies.

Madame Blavatsky: The Mother of Modern Spirituality by Gary Lachman

2012 | ISBN: 1585428639 | English | 352 pages | EPUB | 0.75 MB

A thoughtful biography of one of the most polarizing pioneers of alternative spirituality, the occult-mystic Helena Petrovna Blavatsky.
Pioneer. Visionary. Provocateur. Madame Helena Petrovna Blavatsky—mystic, occult writer, child of Russian aristocrats, spiritual seeker who traveled five continents, and founder (with Henry Steel Olcott) of the Theosophical Society—is still being hailed as an icon and scorned as a fraud more than 120 years after her death. But despite perennial interest in her life, writings, and philosophy, no single biography has examined the controversy and legacy of this influential thinker who helped define modern alternative spirituality—until now.
Gary Lachman, the acclaimed spiritual biographer behind volumes such as Rudolf Steiner and Jung the Mystic, brings us an in-depth look at Blavatsky, objectively exploring her unique and singular contributions toward introducing Eastern and esoteric spiritual ideas to the West during the nineteenth century, as well as the controversies that continue to color the discussions of her life and work.

Kurlumarniny: We Come from the Desert By Monty (Minyjun) Hale

2012 | 250 Pages | ISBN: 0855758309 | PDF | 47 MB

Written in his own native tongue as well as in English, this is the autobiography of Monty Hale, a senior Ngulipartu man from the Pilbara region of Western Australia. A remarkable account of an indigenous life, this narrative chronicles Hale’s migration from the desert to the station country of the eastern Pilbara, his childhood growing up on Mt. Edgar Station, Australia’s engagement in World War II, and the famous Pilbara station-worker’s strike of 1946. Deeply personal and humorous, Hale also describes his relationship with a woman named Nalma; a union that was not accepted by their community.

The Autobiographical Self in Time and Culture By Qi Wang

2013 | 240 Pages | ISBN: 0199737835 | PDF | 2 MB

In this volume, Qi Wang traces the developmental, social, cultural, and historical origins of the autobiographical self – the self that is made of memories of the personal past and of the family and the community. Wang combines rigorous research, sensitive survey of real memories and memory conversations, and fascinating personal anecdotes into a state-of-the-art book. As a “marginal woman” who grew up in the East and works and lives in the West, Wang’s analysis is unique, insightful, and approachable. Her accounts of her own family stories, extraordinarily careful and thorough documentation of research findings, and compelling theoretical insights together convey an unequivocal message: The autobiographical self is conditioned by one’s time and culture. Beginning with a perceptive examination of the form, content, and function of parent-child conversations of personal and family stories, Wang undertakes to show how the autobiographical self is formed in and shaped by the process of family storytelling situated in specific cultural contexts. By contrasting the development of autobiographical writings in Western and Chinese literatures, Wang seeks to demonstrate the cultural stance of the autobiographical self in historical time. She examines the autobiographical self in personal time, thoughtfully analyzing the form, structure, and content of everyday memories to reveal the role of culture in modulating information processing and determining how the autobiographical self is remembered. Focusing on memories of early childhood, Wang seeks to answer the question of when the autobiographical self begins from a cross-cultural perspective. She sets out further to explore some of the most controversial issues in current psychological research of autobiographical memory, focusing particularly on issues of memory representations versus memory narratives and silence versus voice in the construction of the autobiographical self appropriate to one’s cultural assumptions. She concludes with historical analyses of the influences of the larger social, political, and economic forces on the autobiographical self, and takes a forward look at the autobiographical self as a product of modern technology.

The Letters of General Richard S. Ewell: Stonewall’S Successor By Donald C. Pfanz

2012 | 504 Pages | ISBN: 1572339292 , 1572338733 | PDF | 3 MB

Richard S. Ewell was one of only six lieutenant generals to serve in Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia, and of those he was but one of two–the other being Stonewall Jackson, his predecessor as commander of the Second Corps–to have left behind a sizable body of correspondence. Forty-nine of Ewell’s letters were published in 1939. This new volume, drawing on more recently available material and scrupulously annotated by Ewell biographer Donald Pfanz, offers a much larger collection of the general’s missives: 173 personal letters, 7 official letters, 4 battle narratives, and 2 memoranda of incidents that took place during the Civil War. The book covers the full range of Ewell’s career: his days at West Point, his posting on the western frontier, his role in the Mexican War, his Civil War service, and, finally, his postwar years managing farms in Tennessee and Mississippi. Some historians have judged Ewell harshly, particularly for his failure to capture Cemetery Hill on the first day at Gettysburg, but Pfanz contends that Ewell was in fact a brilliant combat general whose overall record, which included victories at the battles of Cross Keys, Second Winchester, and Fort Harrison, was one of which any commanding officer could be proud. Although irritable and often critical of others, Ewell’s correspondence shows him to have been generous toward subordinates, modest regarding his own accomplishments, and upright in both his professional and personal relationships. His letters to family and friends are a mixture of wry humor and uncommon sense. No one who reads them will view this important general in quite the same way again.

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