Trees

BOOKS
GENETICS AND BIOLOGY

1.
DK
trees

This title shows you what others only tell you. Perfect for any budding botanist or dedicated dendrologist this unique visual guide covers every aspect of the world’s trees. You can learn how to identify over 500 species of tree, with essential information on leaf, bark, flower and fruit types and discover the importance of trees and forests as natural habitats and ecosystems. It is ideal for in-the-field reference.

2.
Alton Biggs
Biology (Glencoe Science)

Glencoe Biology helps all students succeed with its organization around major Themes, Big Ideas, and Main Ideas of biology and its strong support for reading comprehension. This program’s comprehensive content is made relevant to students through engaging real-world contexts. A wide variety of lab experiences builds strong inquiry skills. The abundance of differentiated instructional strategies helps teachers reach all learners. Seamlessly integrated technology allows teachers to save time and increase productivity.

3.
Christophe Wiart,
Medicinal Plants of the Asia-Pacific: Drugs for the Future?

This invaluable book provides a readable, introductory text to the fascinating subject of drug discovery from the medicinal plants of Asia-Pacific. A carefully designed layout presents more than 400 medicinal plants, and includes description of compound structure, molecular properties, pharmacology and clinical uses. With its broad scope and extensive compound listings, this is a premier reference source for natural products research using a pharmacological approach. Starting from a collection of plants in the rainforests of Asia-Pacific, Wiart shows how the present state of knowledge fosters a whole new way of looking at the discovery of drugs from medicinal plants.

4.
Thomas N. Sherratt
Avoiding Attack: The Evolutionary Ecology of Crypsis, Warning Signals and Mimicry (Oxford Biology) by Thomas N. Sherratt

This book discusses the diversity of mechanisms by which prey avoid attack by predators and questions how such defensive mechanisms have evolved through natural selection. It considers how potential prey avoid detection, how they make themselves unprofitable to attack, how they signal their unprofitability, and how other species have exploited these signals. Using carefully selected examples drawn from a wide range of species and ecosystems, the authors present a critical analysis of the most important published works in the field.

5.
David Rains Wallace
Beasts of Eden: Walking Whales, Dawn Horses, and Other Enigmas of Mammal Evolution

Mammals first evolved at about the same time as dinosaurs, and their story is perhaps the more fascinating of the two-in part because it is also our own story. In this literate and entertaining book, eminent naturalist David Rains Wallace brings the saga of ancient mammals to a general audience for the first time. Using artist Rudolph Zallinger’s majestic The Age of Mammals mural at the Peabody Museum as a frame for his narrative, Wallace deftly moves over varied terrain-drawing from history, science, evolutionary theory, and art history-to present a lively account of fossil discoveries and an overview of what those discoveries have revealed about early mammals and their evolution.

Rating
( No ratings yet )
Like this post? Please share to your friends:
New magazines in PDF every day from USA, UK, Canada, Australia, download free!
Leave a Reply