Naval Battles and Heroes

BOOKS
HISTORY

1.
Naval Battles and Heroes

The influence of naval events on American history has often been overlooked or misunderstood. For example, every account of the American Revolution records the important captures of the British armies of Burgoyne and Comwallis, but frequently there is no mention of the decisive naval events which made those impressive victories possible.

2.
Jon E. Lewis
London: The Autobiography

From Roman times to the twenty-first century, Londoners and visitors to the city have witnessed the extraordinary events and everyday life and character of this unique and influential city—from politics, culture, sports, religion, and reportage. Bringing to vivid life the human trial of the capital, the book includes the rise and fall of the world-spanning empire, as well as the everyday life of the city. Here, the life of the capital is told, for the first time, by first-hand witnesses. Packed with personality and character, this book is a must for anyone interested in London as well as a wonderful story of a world city.From Roman times to the twenty-first century, Londoners and visitors to the city have witnessed the extraordinary events and everyday life and character of this unique and influential city—from politics, culture, sports, religion, and reportage. Bringing to vivid life the human trial of the capital, the book includes the rise and fall of the world-spanning empire, as well as the everyday life of the city. Here, the life of the capital is told, for the first time, by first-hand witnesses. Packed with personality and character, this book is a must for anyone interested in London as well as a wonderful story of a world city.

3.
Petr Charvt
The Emergence of the Bohemian State (East Central and Eastern Europe in the Middle Ages, 450-1450)

The emergence of the Bohemian state is a long-discussed topic with many obscure points. Though significant progress has been reached in recent decades, the interpretations proposed are far from satisfactory.

Important new information is still awaiting inclusion in explanatory schemes. In addition to that, treatises on the origins of Bohemian state have frequently failed to take account of studies of scholars from abroad. Taking account of all this, the author proposes a fresh look on some of the essential data provided by history, archaeology, art history and cultural or social anthropology. What emerges is a nuanced perspective of the rising of one of central Europes first states, attempting to avoid the pitfalls to which traditional research has been falling, with emphasis on a broad scope of vision taking account of research results reached far and wide.

4.
John O. Anfinson
The River We Have Wrought: A History of the Upper Mississippi

The River We Have Wrought is a landmark history of the upper Mississippi, from early European exploration through the completion of a navigable channel and a system of locks and dams in the mid-twentieth century.

One of the world’s largest and most powerful rivers, the Mississippi became the waterway we know today after massive engineering efforts. Previously, it was often shallow and full of sandbars, snags, and mile-long rapids. Shipping goods and people from St. Louis to St. Paul was arduous and expensive on the natural river, so the farmers and merchants of the region demanded that the federal government transform the upper Mississippi. As a result, in 1930 Congress authorized a system of locks and dams that has revolutionized shipping and, by extension, life in the Midwest.

Anfinson explores the origins of navigation improvements and traces the physical design of the river to the grain empire’s feud with railroads and to the politics of port cities. He also reveals how the conservation movement rose to challenge navigation’s supremacy, questioning the impact of the locks and dams on the ecology of the river.
At a time when the role of such public works and their impact on the environment is being intensely debated, The River We Have Wrought is an essential examination of how politics has shaped the landscapes of the Upper Midwest and how taming the river has affected economic sustainability, river ecology, and biological diversity.

John O. Anfinson is a historian with the Mississippi National River and Recreation Area. For nearly twenty years he was the historian for the Saint Paul District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. He is a founding board member of the Friends of the Mississippi River, an organization dedicated to improving the Mississippi’s environmental health in the Twin Cities.

5.
Rosemary Horrox
A Social History of England, 1200-1500

What was life really like in England in the later Middle Ages? This comprehensive introduction explores the full breadth of English life and society in the period 1200-1500. Opening with a survey of historiographical and demographic debates, the book then explores the central themes of later medieval society, including the social hierarchy, life in towns and the countryside, religious belief, and forms of individual and collective identity.

Clustered around these themes a series of authoritative essays develop our understanding of other important social and cultural features of the period, including the experience of war, work, law and order, youth and old age, ritual, travel and transport, and the development of writing and reading. Written in an accessible and engaging manner by an international team of leading scholars, this book is indispensable both as an introduction for students and as a resource for specialists.

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