Hindi Crash Course book

BOOKS
LEARNING A FOREIGN LANGUAGE

1.
LANGUAGE/30
Hindi Crash Course
(book + audio)

The Original 30-Minute Crash Course!
Speak Hindi in just one short week! LANGUAGE/30 zeroes in on the most essential phrases for day-to-day communication. Whether you are a vacationer, a business traveler, a student, or just need a refresher course, youll learn what you need to know in just three 30-minute sessions a day.
Developed for U.S. Government personnel, this accelerated learning method will have you conversing after just a few easy 30-minute lessons! These widely acclaimed courses have yielded proven results for over 60 years.
Introduction byWorld-Famous Linguist – Charles Berlitz
Includes greetings, personal needs, transportation, business, health and emergency terms, and more!
Covers grammar, pronunciation, social customs, vocabulary, and foreign scripts
Native voices with authentic pronunciation
Digitally remastered, revised, and updated

2.
Rama Kant Agnihotri
Hindi: An Essential Grammar

This text provides a reader-friendly guide to the structural patterns of modern standard Hindi. Ideal for both independent learners and classroom students alike, this book covers the essentials of Hindi grammar in readable, jargon-free sections.

Key features include:
sections on the speech sounds of Hindi
detailed analysis of Hindi sentence structure
full examples throughout.

Standard Hindi, also known as Manak Hindi, High Hindi, Nagari Hindi or Literary Hindi, is a standardised register of Hindustani. It is the official language of India, and is used, along with English, for administration of the central government.[3][4] Standard Hindi is a sanskritised register derived from the khariboli dialect. By contrast, the spoken Hindi dialects form an extensive dialect continuum of the Indic language family, bounded on the northwest and west by Punjabi, Sindhi, Gujarati and Marathi; on the southeast by Oriya; on the east by Bengali; and on the north by Nepali.

The regulating authority for Standard Hindi is the Central Hindi Directorate.

3.
Usha R. Jain
Introduction to Hindi Grammar

A grammar of Hindi intended for first-year students. Presents grammatical constructions of the language in a progressive sequence. Reinforces acquisition through various drills (substitution, transformation, etc.) using elementary vocabulary. Provides core linguistic skills in forty-two chapters. The first section covers Hindi phonetics and writing system followed by pronunciation and writing drills. The remaining chapters deal with the grammatical structures of Hindi such as future tense, postpositions, subjunctive mood, etc. Concludes with a glossary and appendices.

4.
Kali Charan Bahl
A Dictionary of Hindi Verbal Expressions (Hindi-English)

This Dictionary of Hindi Verbal Expressions covers approximately 28,277 verbal expressions in modern standard Hindi (MHS) along with their meanings in English.
Standard Hindi, or more precisely Modern Standard Hindi, also known as Manak Hindi (Devanagari: मानक हिन्दी), High Hindi, Nagari Hindi, and Literary Hindi, is a standardised register of Hindustani identified with Hindus. It is one of the official languages of India, (is also considered as national language) and is used, along with English, for administration of the central government. Standard Hindi is a sanskritised register derived from the khariboli dialect. By contrast, the spoken Hindi dialects form an extensive dialect continuum of the Indic language family, bounded on the northwest and west by Punjabi, Sindhi, Gujarati and Marathi; on the southeast by Oriya; on the east by Bengali; and on the north by Nepali.

The number of speakers of Standard Hindi is ambiguous. According to the 2001 Indian census, 258 million people in India regarded their native language to be “Hindi”. However, this includes large numbers of speakers of Hindi dialects besides Standard Hindi; as of 2009, the best figure Ethnologue could find for Khariboli Hindi was a dated 1991 figure of 180 million.

The regulating authority for Standard Hindi is the Central Hindi Directorate.

The dialect upon which Standard Hindi is based is khariboli, the vernacular of the Delhi region. This dialect acquired linguistic prestige in the Mughal Empire (17th century) and became known as Urdu, “the language of the court.” After independence, the Government of India set about standardizing Hindi as a separate language from Urdu, instituting the following conventions:

* standardization of grammar: In 1954, the Government of India set up a committee to prepare a grammar of Hindi; The committee’s report was released in 1958 as “A Basic Grammar of Modern Hindi”
* standardization of the orthography, using the Devanagari script, by the Central Hindi Directorate of the Ministry of Education and Culture to bring about uniformity in writing, to improve the shape of some Devanagari characters, and introducing diacritics to express sounds from other languages.
* standardization of vocabulary, replacing most of the more learned Persian loan words with new coinages from Sanskrit.

5.
Rupert Snell
Teach Yourself Beginner’s Hindi

Teach Yourself Beginner’s Hindi is a friendly introduction to the language that’s easy to follow from start to finish. It will appeal to anyone who wants to learn Hindi but feels daunted by the prospect of complicated grammar, classes and coursebooks. Everything is explained in simple English and there are hints throughout to make learning easy. Readers may choose whether to learn the script or just to use the transliteration. The book covers everything you need for everyday situations including travel and tourism

6.
Children Picture Dictionary English-English-Hindi with General Knowledge

Colorfully illustrated dictionary for children. Each picture is given not only the name in two languages​​, but also explains the meaning of the word.

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