0486470563


CULTURES – LANGUAGES

1.
Henry Lamar Crosby, John Nevin Schaeffer
An Introduction to Greek (Dover Language Guides)

Generations of students have discovered the enduring pleasures of ancient Greek with this classic text. Supplemented by exercises, readings, and review lessons, it presents concise but thorough coverage of grammatical forms and syntax. Students advance from the simple fundamentals of the alphabet and declensions to the complexities of conditional sentences, and they acquire a Greek vocabulary of more than 600 basic words.
Each chapter begins with a Greek motto, offering insights into classical attitudes and values. Reading selections include the works of Plato, Herodotus, and Homer as well as excerpts from ancient playwrights and the New Testament. More than 120 illustrations depict images of Greek culture related to archaeology, history, and literature. This comprehensive introduction also features Greek-to-English and English-to-Greek glossaries, a complete grammatical appendix, and supplemental information on word formation and etymology.

2.
Adam Gacek
The Arabic Manuscript Tradition the Arabic Manuscript Tradition: A Glossary of Technical Terms and Bibliography a Glossary of Technical Terms and Bibliography

Covering the entire spectrum of Arabic manuscripts, and especially the handwritten book, this book consists of a glossary of technical terms and a bibliography. The technical terms, collected from a variety of sources, embrace a vast range of topics dealing with the making and reading (studying) of Arabic manuscripts. They include: the Arabic scripts, penmanship, writing materials and implements, the make-up of the codex, copying and correction, decoration and bookbinding. A similar coverage is reflected in the bibliography. In view of the fact that, as yet, there is no concise monograph on Arabic manuscripts in the English language, this book is an important contribution to this field. And, since Arabic manuscripts represent an enormous resource for research, this work is an indispensable reference for all students of Islamic civilization.

3.
Gretchen Scoble, Ann Field
The Meaning of Flowers: Myth, Language & Lore

Should you send a rose of crimson or of white to the one you love? What gift of flowers best expresses thanks to a dear friend? From ancient days, long before words complicated what we say to one another, flowers have been our messengers, invested with our most cherished feelings. Illustrated with luscious collages by acclaimed artist Ann Field, this enchanting tribute to the power and symbolism of flowers offers a contemporary introduction to an age-old tradition.

The text draws on botanical, historical, and mythological sources worldwide, from ancient Rome to Victorian England, from Asia to the Americas, presenting portraits of almost 50 blossoms favored for all time. In Persia, for instance, the black medulla of the red tulip was said to represent the lover’s heart, burnt to a coal by love’s passion. To Victorians, lavender signified a broken trust, hollyhocks fertility, and nasturtiums a jest or whimsy. Blending fact, folktale, natural history, and original art, The Meaning of Flowers explores the language and lore of nature’s most intimate and beautiful gifts.

4.
Susanne Klinger
Translation and Linguistic Hybridity: Constructing World-View

This volume outlines a new approach to the study of linguistic hybridity and its translation in cross-cultural writing. By building on concepts from narratology, cognitive poetics, stylistics, and film studies, it explores how linguistic hybridity contributes to the reader’s construction of the textual agents’ world-view and how it can be exploited in order to encourage the reader to empathise with one world-view rather than another and, consequently, how translation shifts in linguistic hybridity can affect the world-view that the reader constructs.

Linguistic hybridity is a hallmark of cross-cultural texts such as postcolonial, migrant and travel writing as source and target language come into contact not only during the process of writing these texts, but also often in the (fictional or non-fictional) story-world. Hence, translation is frequently not only the medium, but also the object of representation. By focussing on the relation between medium and object of representation, the book complements existing research that so far has neglected this aspect. The book thus not only contributes to current scholarly debates – within and beyond the discipline of translation studies – concerned with cross-cultural writing and linguistic hybridity, but also adds to the growing body of translation studies research concerned with questions of voice and point of view.

5.
Mahmoud Gaafar and Jane Wightwick
Practice Makes Perfect Arabic Vocabulary: With 145 Exercises

Go beyond Marhaba and add thousands of words and expressions to your Arabic vocabulary

To communicate comfortably in Arabic, you need easy access to a variety of words and expressions. In Practice Makes Perfect: Arabic Vocabulary you get the tools you need to expand your lexicon and sharpen your speaking and writing skills. And how do you do this? PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE!

Each chapter of this comprehensive book focuses on a theme, such as family, food, or travel, so you can build your language skills in a systematic manner. As you lay the foundation for a burgeoning vocabulary, you will be able to weave your way in and out of English and Arabic to gain the confidence you need to communicate with ease.

Practice Makes Perfect: Arabic Vocabulary offers you:

Thousands of new words and expressions
More than 250 fun exercises
Handy cultural and social tips and an insight into Arab life
An answer key to gauge your comprehension

With help from this book, you can easily communicate in Arabic about:
Education, careers, and skills * Vacations and adventures * Culture, society, and traditions * Cooking and recipes * Your neighborhood and home * Your family and friends * Environmental issues * Crime, justice, and politics . . . and much more


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