The Ancient Economy

Economics and Business

The Entrepreneur Who Built Modern Japan: Shibusawa Eiichi by Shimada Masakazu
The Ancient Economy by M. I. Finley, Ian Morris
The Theory and Practice of Directors’ Remuneration :
New Challenges and Opportunities
Charles R. Morris, “The Dawn of Innovation: The First American Industrial Revolution”
Creditworthy: A History of Consumer Surveillance and Financial Identity in America (Columbia Studies in the History of U.S. Capitalism) by Josh Lauer

The Entrepreneur Who Built Modern Japan: Shibusawa Eiichi by Shimada Masakazu

English | 2017 | ISBN: 4916055799 | 198 pages | PDF | 30 MB
In this penetrating biography of Shibusawa Eiichi (1840-1931), one of Japan’s foremost entrepreneurs, Shimada Masakazu traces Shibusawa’s youth, when he witnessed the decay of Japan’s feudal society and experienced the benefits of modernization at first hand in Europe; his service in the Ministry of Finance of the new Meiji government in its early years; and his venture into business and involvement in literally hundreds of companies as he set about building the roots of modern corporate Japan. Shimada also looks closely at Shibusawa’s social activities and his insistence that economics and morals are inseparable. In troubled times like the present, when the limits of capitalism are being seen around the world, Shibusawa’s vision is as relevant as ever.

The Ancient Economy by M. I. Finley, Ian Morris

English | 1999 | ISBN: 0520219465 | 298 Pages | PDF | 28.9 MB
“Technical progress, economic growth, productivity, even efficiency have not been significant goals since the beginning of time,” declares M. I. Finley in his classic work. The states of the ancient Mediterranean world had no recognizable real-property market, never fought a commercially inspired war, witnessed no drive to capital formation, and assigned the management of many substantial enterprises to slaves and ex-slaves. In short, to study the economies of the ancient world, one must begin by discarding many premises that seemed self-evident before Finley showed that they were useless or misleading. Available again, with a new foreword by Ian Morris, these sagacious, fertile, and occasionally combative essays are just as electrifying today as when Finley first wrote them.

The Theory and Practice of Directors’ Remuneration :
New Challenges and Opportunities

English | 2016 | ISBN: 1785606832 | 299 Pages | PDF | 2.9 MB
The recent financial crisis has led to a loss of trust in corporate governance and in particular on remuneration practices and the propensity for these to create excessive risk-taking – particularly in the financial sector. The main objective of this book is to outline recent practical and theoretical issues and examine emerging new approaches towards directors’ remuneration in the post-crisis period. Written by an established network of international experts, the book provides new data in both cross-sector and cross-country analyses and therefore provides a unique opportunity to compare results and institutional practices across sectors and nations. The book argues for a correct balance between risk and reward and for Directors’ compensation to be equitable to all parties and stakeholders. By examining the current theories, practices and regulations and explaining them in detail it provides a state of the art snapshot of one of the key corporate governance issues of our time.It will be essential reading for graduate students, researchers, lecturers and practitioners in corporate governance and auditing as well as all students in finance, accounting, management and law.

Charles R. Morris, “The Dawn of Innovation: The First American Industrial Revolution”

ISBN: 1586488287, 1610393570 | 2012 | PDF | 384 pages | 5 MB
In the thirty years after the Civil War, the United States blew by Great Britain to become the greatest economic power in world history. That is a well-known period in history, when titans like Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, and J.P. Morgan walked the earth.
But as Charles R. Morris shows us, the platform for that spectacular growth spurt was built in the first half of the century. By the 1820s, America was already the world’s most productive manufacturer, and the most intensely commercialized society in history. The War of 1812 jumpstarted the great New England cotton mills, the iron centers in Connecticut and Pennsylvania, and the forges around the Great Lakes. In the decade after the War, the Midwest was opened by entrepreneurs. In this beautifully illustrated book, Morris paints a vivid panorama of a new nation buzzing with the work of creation. He also points out the parallels and differences in the nineteenth century American/British standoff and that between China and America today.

Creditworthy: A History of Consumer Surveillance and Financial Identity in America (Columbia Studies in the History of U.S. Capitalism) by Josh Lauer

English | July 25th, 2017 | ASIN: B0741DJD1D, ISBN: 023116808X | 368 Pages | EPUB | 41.09 MB
The first consumer credit bureaus appeared in the 1870s and quickly amassed huge archives of deeply personal information about millions of Americans. Today, the three leading credit bureaus are among the most powerful institutions in modern life–yet we know almost nothing about them. Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion are multi-billion-dollar corporations that track our movements, spending behavior, and financial status.
This data is used to predict our riskiness as borrowers and to judge our trustworthiness and value in a broad array of contexts, from insurance and marketing to employment and housing.
In Creditworthy, the first comprehensive history of this crucial American institution, Josh Lauer explores the evolution of credit reporting from its nineteenth-century origins to the rise of the modern consumer data industry. By revealing the sophistication of early credit reporting networks, Creditworthy highlights the leading role that commercial surveillance has played—ahead of state surveillance systems—in monitoring the economic lives of Americans.
Lauer charts how credit reporting grew from an industry that relied on personal knowledge of consumers to one that employs sophisticated algorithms to determine a person’s trustworthiness. Ultimately, Lauer argues that by converting individual reputations into brief written reports—and, later, credit ratings and credit scores—credit bureaus did something more profound: they invented the modern concept of financial identity. Creditworthy reminds us that creditworthiness is never just about economic “facts.” It is fundamentally concerned with—and determines—our social standing as an honest, reliable, profit-generating person.

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