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ESOTERIC / MAGIC

1.
Dr Stephen Skinner, David Rankine
The Keys to the Gateway of Magic: Summoning the Solomonic Archangels and Demon Princes (Sourceworks of Ceremonial Magic)

This classic text of the Nine Great Keys details the invocation of the Archangels, the full hierarchy of spiritual beings (including Olympic Spirits and Elementals) and the evocation of the four Demon Princes.

Highly sought-after, this edition of a rare early seventeenth century grimioire has never before appeared in English. Occult scholar Stephen Skinner, along with magician and author David Rankine, trace the history of the Keys and offer full transcriptions of four key seventeenth century manuscripts in the British Library and in the Bodleian Library.

2.
Matthew Meyer
The Hour of Meeting Evil Spirits: An Encyclopedia of Mononoke and Magic (Yokai)

In Japan, it is said that there are 8 million kami. These spirits encompass every kind of supernatural creature from malign to monstrous, demonic to divine, and everything in between. Most of them seem strange and scary—even evil—from a human perspective. They are known by myriad names: bakemono, chimimoryo, mamono, mononoke, obake, oni, and yokai.

Yokai live in a world that parallels our own. Their lives resemble ours in many ways. They have societies and rivalries. They eat, sing, dance, play, fight, compete, and even wage war. Normally, we keep to our world and they keep to theirs. However, there are times and places where the boundaries between the worlds thin, and crossing over is possible.

The twilight hour—the border between daylight and darkness—is when the boundary between worlds is at its thinnest. Twilight is the easiest time for yokai to cross into this world, or for humans to accidentally cross into theirs. Our world is still awake and active, but the world of the supernatural is beginning to stir. Superstition tells people to return to their villages and stay inside when the sun sets in order to avoid running into demons. This is why in Japanese the twilight hour is called omagatoki: “the hour of meeting evil spirits.”

This encyclopedia contains over 125 illustrated entries detailing the monsters of Japanese folklore and the myths and magic surrounding them.

This book was first funded on Kickstarter in 2013.

3.
Lynn L. Sharp
Secular Spirituality: Reincarnation and Spiritism in Nineteenth-Century France

Secular Spirituality challenges the traditional dichotomy between Enlightenment reason and religion. It follows French romantic socialists’ and spiritists’ search for a new spirituality based on reincarnation as a path to progress for individuals and society. Leaders like Allan Kardec argued for social reform spiritist groups strove for equality and women mediums challenged gender roles. Lynn L. Sharp looks closely at what it meant to practice spiritism, analyszing the movement’s social and political critique and explaining the popularity of the new belief. She explores points of convergence and conflict in the interplay between spiritism and science, spiritism and psychology, and spiritism and the Catholic church to argue that the nineteenth century was not as ‘disenchanted’ as has been thought. Secular Spirituality successfully places spiritism within a larger cultural conversation, going beyond the leaders of the movement to look at the way spiritism functioned for its followers.

4.
T. A. Water
Mind, Myth & Magick

Product Description: Over 800 pages full of astounding and diabolic mentalism – all conceived by one man! T. A. Waters has for years been recognized as one of the most original and knowledgeable minds in Mentalism. In the 80s he released 21 booklets of his mental secrets, which sold to a select clientele for more than 300. Mind, Myth and Magick gives you all this extraordinary Mentalism and additional material, revised, updated and extensively illustrated in a fine hardcover edition. This monumental work contains over 200 effects of Mind Reading and Bizarre Magick, along with extensive re – examinations of psychometry, billet work, book and symbol tests, fortunetelling, Tarot and other classic topics.

5.
Keith Thomas
Religion and the Decline of Magic: Studies in Popular Beliefs in Sixteenth and Seventeenth-Century England

Witchcraft, astrology, divination and every kind of popular magic flourished in England during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, from the belief that a blessed amulet could prevent the assaults of the Devil to the use of the same charms to recover stolen goods. At the same time the Protestant Reformation attempted to take the magic out of religion, and scientists were developing new explanations of the universe. Keith Thomas’s classic analysis of beliefs held on every level of English society begins with the collapse of the medieval Church and ends with the changing intellectual atmosphere around 1700, when science and rationalism began to challenge the older systems of belief.


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