Felix Guattari An Aberrant Introduction

Felix Guattari: An Aberrant Introduction (Transversals: New Directions in Philosophy) by Roy Harris
Everything Real Justin Bieber Fans Should Know & Do by Barry MacDonald
The Road to San Giovanni by Italo Calvino, translated by Tim Parks
Walter J. Ciszek, Daniel L. Flaherty, “With God in Russia: The Inspiring Classic Account of a Catholic Priest’s Twenty-three Years in Soviet Prisons and Labor Camps”
Jhon Jairo Velásquez Vásquez, “Surviving Pablo Escobar: “Popeye” The Hitman 23 Years and 3 Months in Prision”

Felix Guattari: An Aberrant Introduction (Transversals: New Directions in Philosophy) by Roy Harris

Felix Guattari introduces the reader to the diversity and sheer range of Guattari’s interests, from anti-psychiatry, to Japanese culture, political activism and his theorizing of subjectification.Highlighting why Guattari’s work is of increasing relevance to contemporary political, psychoanalytical and philosophical thought, Felix Guattari: An Aberrant Introduction presents the reader with an adventurous and provocative introduction to this radical thinker.

Everything Real Justin Bieber Fans Should Know & Do by Barry MacDonald

Facts essential to official Justin Bieber fandom are collected in an entertaining one to 100 format that lists everything Bieber, from trivia to must-do activities. Those with Bieber fever who follow the pop star on Twitter, have seen Justin Bieber: Never Say Never, or attended a concert will be thrilled to take in such details about the young artist as his musical inspirations, the origins of “Kidrauhl,” and the identities of the recording artists who fought to produce Justin’s first record. The tidbits and trivia featured in the book include Justin’s relationship with his fans, his love life, the celebrities he considers friends, and his ventures outside of music. Appealing to both the fan who wishes to know more and the die-hard who thinks they know it all, this fun read is a lighthearted way for fans to celebrate the singer that captured their hearts.

The Road to San Giovanni by Italo Calvino, translated by Tim Parks

“In each other’s presence we became mute, would walk in silence side by side along the road to San Giovanni. To my father’s mind, words must serve as confirmations of things, and as signs of possession; to mine, they were foretastes of things barely glimpsed, not possessed, presumed.” —from The Road to San Giovanni
In these autobiographical essays, published after Italo Calvino’s death, the intellectually vibrant writer not only reflects on his own past, but also inquires into the very workings of memory itself. From the title essay’s lyrical evocation of the author’s relationship with his father, and a charming account of teenage years spent in the glow of the cinema screen, to Calvino’s reminiscences of his experiences in the Italian Resistance during World War II and of his years in Paris, to his declaration of purpose as a writer in the final essay’s visionary fragments, these five “memory exercises” are heartfelt, affecting, and wise.
“Brimming with Calvino’s beautifully crafted prose, dry humor, and continual questioning . . . Calvino has been very well served by his translator, Tim Parks.” —Observer

Walter J. Ciszek, Daniel L. Flaherty, “With God in Russia: The Inspiring Classic Account of a Catholic Priest’s Twenty-three Years in Soviet Prisons and Labor Camps”

Republished for a new century and featuring an afterword by Father James Martin, SJ, the classic memoir of an American-born Jesuit priest imprisoned for fifteen years in a Soviet gulag during the height of the Cold War—a poignant and spiritually uplifting story of extraordinary faith and fortitude as indelible as Unbroken. Foreword by Daniel L. Flaherty.
While ministering in Eastern Europe during World War II, Polish-American priest Walter Ciszek, S.J., was arrested by the NKVD, the Russian secret police, shortly after the war ended. Accused of being an American spy and charged with “agitation with intent to subvert,” he was held in Moscow’s notorious Lubyanka prison for five years. The Catholic priest was then sentenced without trial to ten more years of hard labor and transported to Siberia, where he would become a prisoner within the forced labor camp system made famous in Alexsandr Solzhenitsyn’s Nobel Prize—winning book The Gulag Archipelago.
In With God in Russia, Ciszek reflects on his daily life as a prisoner, the labor he endured while working in the mines and on construction gangs, his unwavering faith in God, and his firm devotion to his vows and vocation. Enduring brutal conditions, Ciszek risked his life to offer spiritual guidance to fellow prisoners who could easily have exposed him for their own gains. He chronicles these experiences with grace, humility, and candor, from his secret work leading mass and hearing confessions within the prison grounds, to his participation in a major gulag uprising, to his own “resurrection”—his eventual release in a prisoner exchange in October 1963 which astonished all who had feared he was dead.
Powerful and inspirational, With God in Russia captures the heroic patience, endurance, and religious conviction of a man whose life embodied the Christian ideals that sustained him.

Jhon Jairo Velásquez Vásquez, “Surviving Pablo Escobar: “Popeye” The Hitman 23 Years and 3 Months in Prision”

I’ve begged God for forgiveness, but I won’t know till the day I die if He has truly forgiven me …
I’ve paid my dues to society by serving my long sentence, but perhaps I haven’t earned His indulgence …
Oh my God, I’ve lived so many different lives!
I survived Pablo Escobar Gaviria, El Patrón (The Boss), and it was the strength of his indomitable spirit that kept me going all these years; I don’t quite know how or why. I still feel his presence every day of my existence. The Medellin cartel’s crimes weigh as heavily on my shoulders today as they did yesterday. My youth, wasted in crime, became the sword that now hangs over my graying head.
To the world, I’ll always be known by my alias, Popeye, the fearsome hitman of the Medellin cartel, Pablo Escobar Gaviria’s right-hand man … How can I make you understand I’m a new man … that twenty-three years behind bars in that hellhole have transformed the person I once was.
Now the freedom I yearned for is vanishing in the murderous hands of my enemies. Perhaps fate has extended my life only to toy with me by preparing my own dying moments.
I survived in captivity but I don’t know if I’ll be able to live in freedom … A prisoner of my own mind, I’ll try to fight to find some peace …
It’s very cold … now it’s August 2014. I’m one step from freedom and I’m still breathing … still here in this dimly lit cell in the maximum security prison in Cómbita, Boyacá.

Rating
( No ratings yet )
Like this post? Please share to your friends:
New magazines in PDF every day from USA, UK, Canada, Australia, download free!
Leave a Reply