Colonising Egypt

History / Military

The Cold War: A New Oral History of Life Between East and West by Bridget Kendall
Colonising Egypt by Timothy Mitchell
Revolutionary Europe 1780–1850, 2nd Edition by Jonathan Sperber
Saharan Jews and the Fate of French Algeria by Sarah Abrevaya Stein
Locked Up for Freedom: Civil Rights Protesters at the Leesburg Stockade by Heather E. Schwartz

The Cold War: A New Oral History of Life Between East and West by Bridget Kendall

English | July 6, 2017 | ISBN: 178594259X | EPUB | 560 pages | 37.7 MB
The Cold War is one of the furthest-reaching and longest-lasting conflicts in modern history. It spanned the globe – from Greece to China, Hungary to Cuba – and lasted for almost half a century. It has shaped political relations to this day, drawing new physical and ideological boundaries between East and West.
In this meticulously researched account, Bridget Kendall explores the Cold War through the eyes of those who experienced it first-hand. Alongside in-depth analysis that explains the historical and political context, the book draws on exclusive interviews with individuals who lived through the conflict’s key events, offering a variety of perspectives that reveal how the Cold War was experienced by ordinary people. From pilots making food drops during the Berlin Blockade and Japanese fishermen affected by H-bomb testing to families fleeing the Korean War and children whose parents were victims of McCarthy’s Red Scare, The Cold War covers the full geographical and historical reach of the conflict.
Accompanying a landmark BBC Radio 4 series, The Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand how the tensions of the last century have shaped the modern world, and what it was like to live through them.

Colonising Egypt by Timothy Mitchell

English | October 11, 1991 | ISBN: 0520075684, 0521334489 | EPUB | 240 pages | 2.5 MB
Extending deconstructive theory to historical and political analysis, Timothy Mitchell examines the peculiarity of Western conceptions of order and truth through a re-reading of Europe’s colonial encounter with nineteenth-century Egypt.

Revolutionary Europe 1780–1850, 2nd Edition by Jonathan Sperber

English | April 13, 2017 | ISBN: 1138643475, 1138643483 | EPUB | 436 pages | 2.4 MB
Jonathan Sperber’s Revolutionary Europe 1780–1850 is a history of Europe in the age of the French Revolution, from the end of the old regime to the outcome of the revolutions of 1848. Fully revised and updated, this second edition provides a continent-wide history of the key political events and social transformation that took place within this turbulent period, extending as far as their effects within the European colonial society of the Caribbean.
Key features include
analyses of the movement from society’s old regime of orders to a civil society of property owners; the varied consequences of rapid population increase and the spread of market relations in the economy; and the upshot of these changes for political life, from violent revolutions and warfare to dramatic reforms and peaceful mass movements
a lively account of the events of the period and a thorough analysis of the political, cultural and socioeconomic transformations that shaped them
a look into the lives of ordinary people amidst the social and economic developments of the time
a range of maps depicting the developments in Europe’s geographic scope between 1789 and 1848, including for the 1820, 1830 and 1848 revolutions.
Revolutionary Europe 1780–1850 is the perfect introduction for students of the history of the French Revolution and the history of Europe more broadly.

Saharan Jews and the Fate of French Algeria by Sarah Abrevaya Stein

English | 2014 | ISBN: 022612360X, 022612374X | 272 pages | PDF | 3,2 MB
The history of Algerian Jews has thus far been viewed from the perspective of communities on the northern coast, who became, to some extent, beneficiaries of colonialism. But to the south, in the Sahara, Jews faced a harsher colonial treatment. In Saharan Jews and the Fate of French Algeria, Sarah Abrevaya Stein asks why the Jews of Algeria’s south were marginalized by French authorities, how they negotiated the sometimes brutal results, and what the reverberations have been in the postcolonial era.
Drawing on materials from thirty archives across six countries, Stein tells the story of colonial imposition on a desert community that had lived and traveled in the Sahara for centuries. She paints an intriguing historical picture—of an ancient community, trans-Saharan commerce, desert labor camps during World War II, anthropologist spies, battles over oil, and the struggle for Algerian sovereignty. Writing colonialism and decolonization into Jewish history and Jews into the French Saharan one, Saharan Jews and the Fate of French Algeria is a fascinating exploration not of Jewish exceptionalism but of colonial power and its religious and cultural differentiations, which have indelibly shaped the modern world.

Locked Up for Freedom: Civil Rights Protesters at the Leesburg Stockade by Heather E. Schwartz

English | August 1, 2017 | ISBN: 1467785970 | PDF | 64 pages | 26 MB
In 1963, more than 30 African-American girls ages 11 to 16 were arrested for taking part in Civil Rights protests in Americus, Georgia. They were taken without their families’ knowledge to a Civil War era stockade in Leesburg, Georgia, where they were confined in unsanitary conditions and exposed to brutal treatment. Over the following weeks, their commitment to the fight for equality was put to the test. Combining historical research and personal interviews with several of the girls, Heather E. Schwartz brings this true story of the Civil Rights Movement to life.

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