Dance Music Manual Tools, Toys, and Techniques, 2nd edition

Music related
Rick Snoman – Dance Music Manual: Tools, Toys, and Techniques (2nd edition)
Heavy Metal Fun Time Activity Book by Aye Jay Morano
John D. White, “Comprehensive Musical Analysis”
Jazz: The American Theme Song by James Lincoln Collier
The Words and Music of Tom Waits (The Praeger Singer-Songwriter Collection) by Corinne Kessel

Rick Snoman – Dance Music Manual: Tools, Toys, and Techniques (2nd edition)

Whatever your level of experience, the Dance Music Manual is packed with sound advice, techniques, and practical examples to help you achieve professional results. Written by a professional producer and remixer, this book offers a comprehensive approach to music production, including knowledge of the tools, equipment, and different dance genres.
Get more advice and resources from the book’s official website,.

Heavy Metal Fun Time Activity Book by Aye Jay Morano

With all the fun of a heavy metal parking lot without the beer stains and moshing, this activity book for kids and adults is an entirely new take on the coloring book genre.

John D. White, “Comprehensive Musical Analysis”

Evolved from the author’s widely used book, The Analysis of Music, Comprehensive Music Analysis is a guide for acquiring the tools of musical analysis, skills which are essential to every serious musician and musical scholar. The new volume presents material on Heinrich Schenker and reductive linear analysis and additional material on set theoretical analysis. White’s theoretical writing is characterized by logic of methodology, clarity of organization, and lucidity of prose. It should be eagerly received by theorists seeking a comprehensive view of current methodology.
White’s approach to current theoretical dogma is not uncritical. As Gerald Warfield (General Editor of the recent English translation of Schenker’s Der Freie Satz) says in his Preface to White’s new book,”…we begin to glimpse a powerful tool which does not exist in any single school of theory or musicology, but which draws upon any and all nethodologies as required by the analyst. The opinions in this book are strong. Indeed, there is material which may disturb the dogmatic, yet the author’s intentions are clear. White invites you to take your cue for analysis from the compositions themselves rather than from dogma.” Replete with musical examples, charts, and diagrams, the book is more than a treatise on analysis, it is a valuable tool for the advanced student of music as well as the musical scholar.

Jazz: The American Theme Song by James Lincoln Collier

Praised by the Washington Post as a “tough, unblinkered critic,” James Lincoln Collier is probably the most controversial writer on jazz today. His acclaimed biographies of Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, and Benny Goodman continue to spark debate in jazz circles, and his iconoclastic articles on jazz over the past 30 years have attracted even more attention. With the publication of Jazz: The American Theme Song, Collier does nothing to soften his reputation for hard-hitting, incisive commentary. Questioning everything we think we know about jazz–its origins, its innovative geniuses, the importance of improvisation and spontaneous inspiration in a performance–and the jazz world, these ten provocative essays on the music and its place in American culture overturn tired assumptions and will alternately enrage, enlighten, and entertain.
Jazz: The American Theme Song offers music lovers razor-sharp analysis of musical trends and styles, and fearless explorations of the most potentially explosive issues in jazz today. In “Black, White, and Blue,” Collier traces African and European influences on the evolution of jazz in a free-ranging discussion that takes him from the French colony of Saint Domingue (now Haiti) to the orderly classrooms where most music students study jazz today. He argues that although jazz was originally devised by blacks from black folk music, jazz has long been a part of the cultural heritage of musicians and audiences of all races and classes, and is not black music per se. In another essay, Collier provides a penetrating analysis of the evolution of jazz criticism, and casts a skeptical eye on the credibility of the emerging “jazz canon” of critical writing and popular history. “The problem is that even the best jazz scholars keep reverting to the fan mentality, suddenly bursting out of the confines of rigorous analysis into sentimental encomiums in which Hot Lips Smithers is presented as some combination of Santa Claus and the Virgin Mary,” he maintains. “It is a simple truth that there are thousands of high school music students around the country who know more music theory than our leading jazz critics.” Other, less inflammatory but no less intriguing, essays include explorations of jazz as an intrinsic and fundamental source of inspiration for American dance music, rock, and pop; the influence of show business on jazz, and vice versa; and the link between the rise of the jazz soloist and the new emphasis on individuality in the 1920s.
Impeccably researched and informed by Collier’s wide-ranging intellect, Jazz: The American Theme Song is an important look at jazz’s past, its present, and its uncertain future. It is a book everyone who cares about the music will want to read.

The Words and Music of Tom Waits (The Praeger Singer-Songwriter Collection) by Corinne Kessel

Tom Waits’s distinctive, bourbon-soaked growl, his unique persona, and his incorporation of musical styles from blues to experimental to vaudeville have secured for him a top-shelf cult following and an extraordinary critical respect. The idea of the Wanderer – someone who seeks an escape from all of life’s problems, and dreams himself into oblivion – serves as the fundamental personality type around which all Waits’s music revolves. Ten years of producing and touring with Waits’s macabre folktale adaptation across Canada and the U.S. has given author Corinne Kessel direct access to his work, creative process, and his associates. In this comprehensive analysis, Kessel examines all of the many characters that have appeared throughout the course of Waits’ musical career, from Closing Time (1973) to Orphans: Brawlers, Bawlers, and Bastards.
His raw form of expression and his evocative lyrics work together to form an emotional chronicle of society’s misfits, outcasts, and lowlifes. He is not the sort of composer to chase after shiny red fire trucks to awesome blazing fires, but instead looks after the intangible dreams found dissipating in the last wisp of smoke from a cigarette, held in the weathered hands of a broken soul. Here, author Corinne Kessel pursues Waits into this distinctly murky and unsettled atmosphere to address in particular Waits’s enduring questions of reality, landscape, and identity.

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