10 Amazing Bridges by Chris Peacock

PHOTOS & CINEMA RELATED

1.
Chris Peacock
10 Amazing Bridges

This quick-read guide introduces the reader to ten of the most amazing bridges in the world. Including photographs of every bridge and a brief description of the history of the structure, this ebook has been specially formatted for today’s e-readers.

2.
Francis Burke, Marguerite R. Waller
Federico Fellini: Contemporary Perspectives

Federico Fellini remains the best known of the postwar Italian directors. This collection of essays brings Fellini criticism up to date, employing a range of recent critical filters, including semiotic, psychoanalytical, feminist and deconstructionist. Accordingly, a number of important themes arise – the reception of fascism, the crisis of the subject, the question of agency, homo-eroticism, feminism, and constructions of gender.
Since the early 1970s, a slide in critical and theoretical attention to Fellini’s work has corresponded with an assumption that his films are self-indulgent and lacking in political value. This volume moves the discussion towards a politics of signification, contending that Fellini’s evolving self-reflexivity is not mere solipsism but rather a critique of both aesthetics and signification. The essays presented here are almost all new – the two exceptions being important signifiers in Fellini studies. The first, Frank Burke’s “Federico Fellini: Reality/Representation/Signification” laid the foundation in the late 1980s for considering Fellini’s work in the light of postmodernism. The second, Marguerite Waller’s “Whose Dolce Vita is this Anyway?: The Language of Fellini’s Cinema” (1990), provides a contemporary re-reading of Fellini’s most successful film.
This lively and ambitious collection brings a new critical language to bear on Fellini’s films, offering fresh insights into their underlying issues and meaning. In bringing Fellini criticism up to date, it will have a significant impact on film studies, reclaiming this important director for a contemporary audience.

3.
M. Elise Marubbio
Killing the Indian Maiden: Images of Native American Women in Film

Killing the Indian Maiden examines the fascinating and often disturbing portrayal of Native American women in film. Through discussion of thirty-four Hollywood films from the silent period to the present, M. Elise Marubbio examines the sacrificial role of what she terms the “Celluloid Maiden”―a young Native woman who allies herself with a white male hero and dies as a result of that choice. Marubbio intertwines theories of colonization, gender, race, and film studies to ground her study in sociohistorical context all in an attempt to define what it means to be an American. As Marubbio charts the consistent depiction of the Celluloid Maiden, she uncovers two primary characterizations―the Celluloid Princess and the Sexualized Maiden. The archetype for the exotic Celluloid Princess appears in silent films such as Cecil B. DeMille’s The Squaw Man (1914) and is thoroughly established in American iconography in Delmer Daves’s Broken Arrow (1950). Her more erotic sister, the Sexualized Maiden, emerges as a femme fatale in such films as DeMille’s North West Mounted Police (1940), King Vidor’s Duel in the Sun (1946), and Charles Warren’s Arrowhead (1953). The two characterizations eventually combine to form a hybrid Celluloid Maiden who first appears in John Ford’s The Searchers (1956) and reappears in the 1970s and the 1990s in such films as Arthur Penn’s Little Big Man (1970) and Michael Apted’s Thunderheart (1992). Killing the Indian Maiden reveals a cultural iconography about Native Americans and their role in the frontier embedded in the American psyche. The Native American woman is a racialized and sexualized other―a conquerable body representing both the seductions and the dangers of the frontier. These films show her being colonized and suffering at the hands of Manifest Destiny and American expansionism, but Marubbio argues that the Native American woman also represents a threat to the idea of a white America. The complexity and longevity of the Celluloid Maiden icon―persisting into the twenty-first century―symbolizes an identity crisis about the composition of the American national body that has played over and over throughout different eras and political climates. Ultimately, Marubbio establishes that the ongoing representation of the Celluloid Maiden signals the continuing development and justification of American colonialism.

4.
Mike Wayne
Politics of Contemporary European Cinema

How does contemporary European Cinema reflect the drive for political and economic integration and recent trends in globalisation, if at all? This book is a valuable excursion into the politics of European cinema and extensively addresses questions like this.
Mike Wayne identifies some key themes pertinent to a study of the contemporary cultural and political dynamics of European cinema from the mid-1980’s, including the fall of the Berlin wall and the end of the Soviet Empire.
Throughout the book, issues are raised that question European culture and the nature of national cinema, including;
• The cultural relationship with Hollywood;
• Debates over cultural plurality and diversity;
• The disintegration of nation states along the eastern flank;
• Postcolonial travels and the hybridisation of the national formation.

5.
Barbara Hales, Mihaela Petrescu, Valerie Weinstein
Continuity and Crisis in German Cinema, 1928-1936 edited

Hitler’s Machtergreifung, or seizure of power, on January 30, 1933, marked the end of the Weimar Republic and the beginning of the Third Reich, and German film scholarship has generally accepted this date as the break between Weimar and Nazi-era film as well. This collection of essays interrogates the continuities and discontinuities in German cinema before and after January 1933 and their relationship to the various crises of the years 1928 to 1936 in seven areas: politics, the economy, concepts of race and ethnicity, the making of cinema stars, genre cinema, film technologies and aesthetics, and German-international film relations. Focusing both on canonical and lesser-known works, the essays analyze a representative sample of films and genres from the period.

This book will be of interest to scholars and students of Weimar and Third Reich cinema and of the sociopolitical, economic, racial, artistic, and technological spheres in both late Weimar and the early Third Reich, as well as to film scholars in general.

6.
Haje Jan Kamps
The Ilex Introduction to Photography: Capturing the Moment Every Time, Whatever Camera You Have

Photography is a big part of our lives, and we all take photos all the time. By understanding just a few basics of how your camera – or your phone – works, you’ll find yourself able to take more exciting, stand-out photos.

Within a few pages you’ll be able to speak with confidence to photographers about exposure settings, decide what lighting or lenses will lift a scene, or what tactics you can use to make your subject look more interesting.

The book also covers the basics of managing, editing & sharing your collection of digital images so you’re not at the mercy of the software that was bundled with your phone.

7.
John Shaw
John Shaw’s Guide to Digital Nature Photography

Photography legend John Shaw returns with his much-anticipated guide to digital nature photography, complete with more than 250 extraordinarily beautiful photographs.

For over four decades, John Shaw’s authentic voice and trusted advice has helped photographers achieve impressive shots in the great outdoors. In his first-ever book on digital photography, Shaw provides in-depth advice on everything from equipment and lenses to thorough coverage of digital topics including how to use the histogram. In addition, he offers inspirational and frank insight that goes far beyond the nuts and bolts of photography, explaining that successful photos come from having a vision, practicing, and then acquiring the equipment needed to accomplish the intention. Easily digestible and useful for every type of photographer, and complete with more than 250 jaw-dropping images, John Shaw’s Guide to Digital Nature Photography is the one book you’ll need to beautifully capture the world around you.

8.
David Plummer
7 Years of Camera Shake: One Man’s Passion for Photographing Wildlife

As humans, we are drawn to predators like no other group of animals. They are the epitome of form and function, and have a level of perfection that we revere.

In 2009, wildlife expert, conservationist and photographer David Plummer was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. Rather than let it defeat him, he was galvanised to grab life by the horns and achieve the perfect wildlife shot.

Over the next seven years, he did much more than that. The result is this breathtaking collection of over 200 of his best and favourite photographs of exotic and wild animals intheir natural habitats. To capture them, David travelled to some of the most remote andstunning locations across the world, from Africa to India to the Galápagos Islands and back to his native England.

7 Years of Camera Shake showcases seven years of immersive and illuminating photography: of predators on the prowl, of prey in the clutches of death, of the inexplicable synchronisation of nature, of the beautiful relationship between mother and child, and much, much more.

Plummer’s work has been featured in wildlife publications and national and international press, and now the work he has produced since his diagnosis is showcased here, accompanied by his thoughts and anecdotes on how he achieved each perfect shot.

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