Why Nations Fail The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty


Politics, Sociology

James A. R. Nafziger, Robert Kirkwood Paterson, Alison Dundes Renteln, “Cultural Law: International, Comparative, and Indigenous”
An Insider’s Guide to the UN
Violence, Culture And Censure by Professor Colin Sumner
Handbook of Conflict Analysis and Resolution by Dennis J.D. Sandole, Sean Byrne, Ingrid Sandole-Staroste, Jessica Senehi
Daron Acemoğlu, James A. Robinson – Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty

James A. R. Nafziger, Robert Kirkwood Paterson, Alison Dundes Renteln, “Cultural Law: International, Comparative, and Indigenous”

English | 2012 | ISBN: 0511751001 | PDF | pages: 1040 | 4.8 mb

Cultural law is a new and exciting field of study and practice. The core themes of linguistic and other cultural rights, cultural heritage, traditional crafts and knowledge, the performing arts, sports, and religion are of fundamental importance to people around the world, engaging them at the grass roots and often commanding their daily attention. The related legal processes are both significant and complex. This unique collection of materials and commentary on cultural law covers a broad range of themes. Opening chapters explore critical issues involving cultural activities, artifacts, and status as well as the fundamental concepts of culture and law. Subsequent chapters examine the dynamic interplay of law and culture with respect to each of the core themes. The materials demonstrate the reality and efficacy of comparative, international, and indigenous law and legal practices in the dynamic context of culture-related issues. Throughout the book, these issues are presented at multiple levels of legal authority: international, national, and subnational.

An Insider’s Guide to the UN

ISBN: 0300203659 | 2015 | EPUB | 320 pages | 10 MB

Termed “the indispensable source on the United Nations” by Joseph S. Nye of Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, this book is now fully revised and updated to include new material on fragile states, R2P (responsibility to protect), recent Security Council issues such as the revolts in Libya and Syria, and a greatly expanded section on understanding and participating in a Model UN.

Violence, Culture And Censure by Professor Colin Sumner

English | 1997 | ISBN: 0748405542 | 232 Pages | PDF | 2 MB

Essays reflecting on our understanding and moral judgement of violence. The essays argue that even serious violence is not a simple fact, but a category of thought and practice rooted in history, culture and society.

Handbook of Conflict Analysis and Resolution by Dennis J.D. Sandole, Sean Byrne, Ingrid Sandole-Staroste, Jessica Senehi

Language: English | 2008 | ISBN: 0415433959 | 576 pages | PDF | 2,25 MB

This major Handbook comprises cutting-edge essays from leading scholars in the field of Conflict Analysis and Resolution (CAR). The volume provides a comprehensive overview of the core concepts, theories, approaches, processes, and intervention designs in the field. The central theme is the value of multidisciplinary approaches to the analysis and resolution of conflicts. This consists of moving from the study of analytical approaches to understanding the deep-rooted causes of conflict, to third-party intervention approaches to preventing or ending violence, and to resolving and transforming conflict. The book is divided into four main parts: Part I: Core Concepts and Theories Part II: Core Approaches Part III: Core Practices Part IV: Alternative Voices and Complex Intervention Designs The Handbook of Conflict Analysis and Resolution is a benchmark publication with major importance both for current research and for the future of the field. It will be essential reading for all students of conflict resolution, peace and conflict studies, and International Relations in general, as well as to practitioners in the field.

Daron Acemoğlu, James A. Robinson – Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty

Published: 2012-03-20 | ISBN: 0307719219, 0307719227 | EPUB + MOBI | 544 pages | 17 MB

Brilliant and engagingly written, Why Nations Fail answers the question that has stumped the experts for centuries: Why are some nations rich and others poor, divided by wealth and poverty, health and sickness, food and famine?
Is it culture, the weather, geography? Perhaps ignorance of what the right policies are?
Simply, no. None of these factors is either definitive or destiny. Otherwise, how to explain why Botswana has become one of the fastest growing countries in the world, while other African nations, such as Zimbabwe, the Congo, and Sierra Leone, are mired in poverty and violence?
Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson conclusively show that it is man-made political and economic institutions that underlie economic success (or lack of it). Korea, to take just one of their fascinating examples, is a remarkably homogeneous nation, yet the people of North Korea are among the poorest on earth while their brothers and sisters in South Korea are among the richest. The south forged a society that created incentives, rewarded innovation, and allowed everyone to participate in economic opportunities. The economic success thus spurred was sustained because the government became accountable and responsive to citizens and the great mass of people. Sadly, the people of the north have endured decades of famine, political repression, and very different economic institutions—with no end in sight. The differences between the Koreas is due to the politics that created these completely different institutional trajectories.
Based on fifteen years of original research Acemoglu and Robinson marshall extraordinary historical evidence from the Roman Empire, the Mayan city-states, medieval Venice, the Soviet Union, Latin America, England, Europe, the United States, and Africa to build a new theory of political economy with great relevance for the big questions of today, including:
– China has built an authoritarian growth machine. Will it continue to grow at such high speed and overwhelm the West?
– Are America’s best days behind it? Are we moving from a virtuous circle in which efforts by elites to aggrandize power are resisted to a vicious one that enriches and empowers a small minority?
– What is the most effective way to help move billions of people from the rut of poverty to prosperity? More
philanthropy from the wealthy nations of the West? Or learning the hard-won lessons of Acemoglu and Robinson’s breakthrough ideas on the interplay between inclusive political and economic institutions?
Why Nations Fail will change the way you look at—and understand—the world.


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