Greed is Good Maximization and Elite Deviance in America

Politics, Sociology

Matthew Robinson, Daniel Murphy, “Greed is Good: Maximization and Elite Deviance in America”
Kurt W. Jefferson, “Christianity’s Impact on World Politics: Not by Might, Nor by Power”
The Ottoman Empire and Early Modern Europe by Daniel Goffman
The Nazi-Fascist New Order for European Culture by Benjamin G. Martin
Wendy Chapkis, “Live Sex Acts: Women and Commercial Sex”
Matthew Robinson, Daniel Murphy, “Greed is Good: Maximization and Elite Deviance in America”

2008 | pages: 139 | ISBN: 0742560716 | PDF | 0,7 mb
Centered on the concept of ‘Maximization,’ Matthew B. Robinson and Dr. Daniel S. Murphy offer a new theory of elite deviance and corporate crime called contextual anomie/strain theory. Exploring how simultaneous use of legitimate (i.e., legal) and illegitimate (i.e., deviant or illegal) means of opportunity in pursuit of one’s goals, Greed is Good explains various forms of elite deviance and corporate crime. Contextual anomie/strain theory posits that although everyone in American society experiences stress and frustration association with American Dream, there are certain contexts in American society that produce even greater stress, frustration, and pressures toward crime. One such context is the corporate workplace. This book affirms how deviance and criminality have become normal in big business due to pressure to produce massive profits at the expense of all other considerations.

Kurt W. Jefferson, “Christianity’s Impact on World Politics: Not by Might, Nor by Power”

2002 | pages: 227 | ISBN: 0820461164 | PDF | 5,2 mb
At the dawn of the twenty-first century, Christianity is having a profound impact on politics around the world. The rather salient role that religion – namely Christianity – plays in world affairs is illustrated by the rise of evangelical Christian leaders in secular politics in Africa, the attempts at a profound and historic peace between Palestinian Arabs and Israelis in Israel, and the role of Christianity as a new system of belief for those who formerly adhered to the atheistic and purposely secular vision of the Marxist-Leninist ideology in Russia and the lands of the former Soviet Union. This book reviews important political developments around the world and explains where Christianity, especially in its evangelical forms, has affected politics and society.

The Ottoman Empire and Early Modern Europe by Daniel Goffman

English | April 25th, 2002 | ASIN: B001G8WZ3K, ISBN: 0521459087, 0521452805 | 302 pages | AZW3 | 4.88 MB
Despite the fact that its capital city and over one third of its territory was within the continent of Europe, the Ottoman Empire has consistently been regarded as a place apart, inextricably divided from the West by differences of culture and religion. A perception of its militarism, its barbarism, its tyranny, the sexual appetites of its rulers and its pervasive exoticism has led historians to measure the Ottoman world against a western standard and find it lacking.
In recent decades, a dynamic and convincing scholarship has emerged that seeks to comprehend and, in the process, to de-exoticize this enduring realm. Dan Goffman provides a thorough introduction to the history and institutions of the Ottoman Empire from this new standpoint, and presents a claim for its inclusion in Europe. His lucid and engaging book – an important addition to New Approaches to European History – will be essential reading for undergraduates.

The Nazi-Fascist New Order for European Culture by Benjamin G. Martin

English | October 24th, 2016 | ISBN: 0674545745 | 381 pages | PDF | 8.17 MB
Following France’s crushing defeat in June 1940, the Nazis moved forward with plans to reorganize a European continent now largely under Hitler’s heel. While Germany’s military power would set the agenda, several among the Nazi elite argued that permanent German hegemony required something more: a pan-European cultural empire that would crown Hitler’s wartime conquests.
At a time when the postwar European project is under strain, Benjamin G. Martin brings into focus a neglected aspect of Axis geopolitics, charting the rise and fall of Nazi-fascist “soft power” in the form of a nationalist and anti-Semitic new ordering of European culture.
As early as 1934, the Nazis began taking steps to bring European culture into alignment with their ideological aims. In cooperation and competition with Italy’s fascists, they courted filmmakers, writers, and composers from across the continent. New institutions such as the International Film Chamber, the European Writers Union, and the Permanent Council of composers forged a continental bloc opposed to the “degenerate” cosmopolitan modernism that held sway in the arts. In its place they envisioned a Europe of nations, one that exalted traditionalism, anti-Semitism, and the Volk. Such a vision held powerful appeal for conservative intellectuals who saw a European civilization in decline, threatened by American commercialism and Soviet Bolshevism.
Taking readers to film screenings, concerts, and banquets where artists from Norway to Bulgaria lent their prestige to Goebbels’s vision, Martin follows the Nazi-fascist project to its disastrous conclusion, examining the internal contradictions and sectarian rivalries that doomed it to failure.

Wendy Chapkis, “Live Sex Acts: Women and Commercial Sex”

1997 | ISBN-10: 0415912873, 0415912881 | 248 pages | PDF | 4 MB
Drawing on more than 50 interviews in both the criminalized sex industry of the United States and in the free and open trade in the Netherlands, this volume aims to capture the wide-ranging experiences of women performing erotic labour and offers a complex, multi-faceted depiction of sex work. The analytic perspective encompasses both a serious examination of international prostitution policy as well as a hands-on account of such contemporary commercial sexual practices as an “erotic yoni massage ritual”.

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