Primitives in the Wilderness Deep Ecology and the Missing Human Subject

Politics, Sociology

Primitives in the Wilderness: Deep Ecology and the Missing Human Subject by Peter C. van Wyck
Social Theory for Alternative Societies by Matt Dawson
Blurred Lines: Rethinking Sex, Power, and Consent on Campus by Vanessa Grigoriadis
Durkheim’s Sociology of Religion: Themes and Theories by R. B. Pickering
The Culture of Cities (Forbidden Bookshelf) by Lewis Mumford, edited by Mark Crispin Miller

Primitives in the Wilderness: Deep Ecology and the Missing Human Subject by Peter C. van Wyck

English | July 31, 1997 | ISBN: 0791434338, 0791434346 | PDF | 194 pages | 1.4 MB
Brings the radical environmentalism known as deep ecology into an encounter with contemporary social and cultural theory, showing that deep ecology still has much to learn from such theory.
In Primitives in the Wilderness, Peter van Wyck brings the radical environmentalism known as deep ecology into an encounter with contemporary social and cultural theory. With an eye to critically exposing unexamined essentialist and foundational commitments, the author shows how deep ecology remains profoundly entangled with the very traditions of thought it has sought to overcome. The author critically assesses deep ecology’s relations with the Enlightenment, modernity, systems theory, anthropocentrism, the figure of wilderness and the trope of the primitive, and the imagined promise of posthistoric primitivism. He demonstrates the manner in which deep ecology (and much of contemporary environmental thought) has remained blind to the lessons (and possibilities) of contemporary social and poststructural theory.
Drawing from an array of contemporary theoretical works (including Haraway’s figure of the cyborg and situated knowledges, Deleuze’s conception of an image of thought, Foucault’s panopticon, Trinh on ethnographic authority, Lingis on the “Other,” Torgovnick and Clastres’s work on the primitive and power, and Vattimo’s “weak thought”), van Wyck opens a clearing within which the ecological problematic and the question of the human subject may be rethought.

Social Theory for Alternative Societies by Matt Dawson

English | 2016 | ISBN: 1137337338, 113733732X | 248 pages | PDF | 3,6 MB
This book traces a unique story of social theory: one which focuses on its role in offering ideas for alternative societies. In charting this story, Matt Dawson argues that the differences in alternatives offered by social theorists not only demonstrate the diversity in, and value of, sociological perspectives, but also emphasize competing ideas of the role of intellectuals in social change.
The text discusses a collection of social theorists –from key figures such as Marx, Durkheim and Du Bois to less well known or now commonly overlooked writers such as Levitas, Lefebvre and Mannheim. It explains their use of the tools of sociology to critique society and provide visions for alternatives, highlighting elements of the intellectual backgrounds of movements such as socialism, anti-racism, feminism and cosmopolitanism.
Social Theory for Alternative Societies not only explores in detail a variety of thinkers, but also reflects on the relevance of sociology today and on the connection between social theory and the ‘real world.’ Thus it will be of interest to students of sociology and those interested in ideas for a better society.

Blurred Lines: Rethinking Sex, Power, and Consent on Campus by Vanessa Grigoriadis

English | September 5, 2017 | ISBN: 0544702557 | EPUB | 358 pages | 3.3 MB
What’s really happening behind closed doors on America’s college campuses?
A new sexual revolution is sweeping the country, and college students are on the front lines. Women use fresh, smart methods to fight entrenched sexism and sexual assault even as they celebrate their own sexuality as never before. Many “woke” male students are more sensitive to women’s concerns than previous generations ever were, while other men perpetuate the most cruel misogyny. Amid such apparent contradictions, it’s no surprise that intense confusion shrouds the topic of sex on campus.
Vanessa Grigoriadis dispels that confusion as no other writer could by traveling to schools large and small, embedding in their social whirl, and talking candidly with dozens of students – among them, both accusers and accused– as well as administrators, parents, and researchers. Her unprecedented investigation presents a host of new truths. She reveals which times and settings are most dangerous for women (for instance, beware the “red zone”); she demystifies the welter of conflicting statistics about the prevalence of campus rape; she makes a strong case that not all “sexual assault” is equivalent; and she offers convincing if controversial advice on how schools, students, and parents can make college a safer, richer experience. The sum of her fascinating, fly-on-the-wall reportage is a revelatory account of how long-standing rules of sex and power are being rewritten from scratch.

Durkheim’s Sociology of Religion: Themes and Theories by R. B. Pickering

English | 2009 | ISBN: 0227172973 | 577 pages | PDF | 15 MB
Religion is central to Durkheim’s theory of society, and his work laid most of the foundations of the sociology of religion. Daring and brilliant though his analysis was, its bold claims and questionable premises has made it the subject of ongoing academic debate. Durkheim’s work on the subject reached a peak with the publication in 1912 of what turned out to be a classic in its field, The Elementary Forms of the Religious Life. No other book has explained Durkheim’s views on religion using the whole corpus of his writings. Dr Pickering shows how Durkheim’s position developed and explains the themes and theories that run through Durkheim’s work. This includes Durkheim’s attitude towards secularisation and Christian churches, as well as his notion of the contemporary cult of the individual.

The Culture of Cities (Forbidden Bookshelf) by Lewis Mumford, edited by Mark Crispin Miller

English | March 8, 2016 | ASIN: B01AVTU71Q | AZW3 | 640 pages | 1.3 MB
A visionary survey of urbanism from the Middle Ages to the late 1930s, with a new introduction by Thomas Fisher
Considered among the greatest works of Lewis Mumford—a prolific historian, sociologist, philosopher of technology, and longtime architecture critic for the New Yorker—The Culture of Cities is a call for communal action to “rebuild the urban world on a sounder human foundation.” First published in 1938, this radical investigation into the human environment is based on firsthand surveys of North American and European locales, as well as extensive historical and technological research. Mumford takes readers from the compact, worker-friendly streets of medieval hamlets to the symmetrical neoclassical avenues of Renaissance cities. He studies the squalor of nineteenth-century factory towns and speculates on the fate of the booming twentieth-century Megalopolis—whose impossible scale, Mumford believes, can only lead to its collapse into a “Nekropolis,” a monstrosity of living death.
A civic visionary, Mumford is credited with some of the earliest proposals for ecological urban planning and the appropriate use of technology to create balanced living environments. In the final chapters of The Culture of Cities, he outlines possible paths toward utopian future cities that could be free of the stressors of the Megalopolis, in sync with the rhythms of daily life, powered by clean energy, integrated with agricultural regions, and full of honest and comfortable housing for the working class. The principles set forth by these visions, once applied to Nazi-occupied Europe’s razed cities, are still relevant today as technological advances and overpopulation change the nature of urban life.

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