The Origins of Public Diplomacy in US Statecraft Uncovering a Forgotten Tradition

Politics, Sociology
The Origins of Public Diplomacy in US Statecraft: Uncovering a Forgotten Tradition By Dr. Caitlin E. Schindler
Metrics of Subjective Well-Being: Limits and Improvements By Gaël Brulé, Filomena Maggino
Chinese Capitalisms: Historical Emergence and Political Implications (International Political Economy Series) by Y. Chu
Defining International Terrorism: Between State Sovereignty and Cosmopolitanism By Stella Margariti
The New Brooklyn: What It Takes to Bring a City Back by Kay S. Hymowitz

The Origins of Public Diplomacy in US Statecraft: Uncovering a Forgotten Tradition By Dr. Caitlin E. Schindler

This book examines historic examples of US public diplomacy in order to understand how past uses and techniques of foreign public engagement evolved into modern public diplomacy as a tool of American statecraft. The study explores six historic cases where the United States’ government or private American citizens actively engaged with foreign publics, starting with the American Revolution in 1776 through the passage of the Smith-Mundt Bill of 1948.
Each case looks specifically at the role foreign public engagement plays in American statecraft, while also identifying trends in American foreign public engagement and making connections between past practice of foreign public engagement and public diplomacy, and analyzing how trends and past practice or experience influenced modern American public diplomacy.

Metrics of Subjective Well-Being: Limits and Improvements By Gaël Brulé, Filomena Maggino

This volume analyses the quantification of the effect of factors measuring subjective well-being, and in particular on the metrics applied. With happiness studies flourishing over the last decades, both in number of publications as well as in their exposure, researchers working in this field are aware of potential weaknesses and pitfalls of these metrics. Contributors to this volume reflect on different factors influencing quantification, such as scale size, wording, language, biases, and cultural comparability in order to raise awareness on the tools and on their conditions of use.

Chinese Capitalisms: Historical Emergence and Political Implications (International Political Economy Series) by Y. Chu

In Chinese Capitalisms , experts examine the rise of capitalism on China and Taiwan, analyzing impacts exerted by global capitalism, Chinese civilization, and remnants of socialist practice. In focusing on these, they also address longstanding issues such as Weber’s China Thesis, state-business relationships, and China’s civil society, among others.

Defining International Terrorism: Between State Sovereignty and Cosmopolitanism By Stella Margariti

This book is an attempt to approach the issue of defining international terrorism, proposing that the most workable way to do so is to achieve due balance between the two principal driving forces of international law developments: State sovereignty interests and cosmopolitan ideals. All those who aspire to the promotion of international criminal justice and the fight against impunity agree that the formulation of a universal definition of international terrorism will further enhance the fight against terrorism and offer a universally acceptable legal framework within which this fight can be conducted.

The New Brooklyn: What It Takes to Bring a City Back by Kay S. Hymowitz

Only a few decades ago, the Brooklyn stereotype well known to Americans was typified by television programs such as “The Honeymooners” and “Welcome Back, Kotter”—comedies about working-class sensibilities, deprivation, and struggles. Today, the borough across the East River from Manhattan is home to trendsetters, celebrities, and enough “1 percenters” to draw the Occupy Wall Street protests across the Brooklyn Bridge. “Tres Brooklyn,” has become a compliment among gourmands in Parisian restaurants. In The New Brooklyn, Kay Hymowitz chronicles the dramatic transformation of the once crumbling borough. Devoting separate chapters to Park Slope, Williamsburg, Bed Stuy and the Brooklyn Navy Yard, Hymowitz identifies the government policies and young, educated white and black middle class enclaves responsible for creating thousands of new businesses, safe and lively streets, and one of the most desirable urban environments in the world.
Exploring Brownsville, the growing Chinatown of Sunset Park, and Caribbean Canarsie, Hymowitz also wrestles with the question of whether the borough’s new wealth can lift up long disadvantaged minorities, and the current generation of immigrants, many of whom will need more skills than their predecessors to thrive in a postindustrial economy.
The New Brooklyn’s portraits of dramatic urban transformation, and its sometimes controversial effects, offers prescriptions relevant to “phoenix” cities coming back to life across the United States and beyond its borders.

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